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Identification of Receptors for Eating Disorders using Gap Statistic Methods

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International Journal of Computer Applications
Foundation of Computer Science (FCS), NY, USA
Year of Publication: 2017
Authors:
T. Venkata Sai Krishna, Yesu Babu Adimulam, R. Kiran Kumar
10.5120/ijca2017915638

Venkata Sai T Krishna, Yesu Babu Adimulam and Kiran R Kumar. Identification of Receptors for Eating Disorders using Gap Statistic Methods. International Journal of Computer Applications 176(7):28-31, October 2017. BibTeX

@article{10.5120/ijca2017915638,
	author = {T. Venkata Sai Krishna and Yesu Babu Adimulam and R. Kiran Kumar},
	title = {Identification of Receptors for Eating Disorders using Gap Statistic Methods},
	journal = {International Journal of Computer Applications},
	issue_date = {October 2017},
	volume = {176},
	number = {7},
	month = {Oct},
	year = {2017},
	issn = {0975-8887},
	pages = {28-31},
	numpages = {4},
	url = {http://www.ijcaonline.org/archives/volume176/number7/28568-2017915638},
	doi = {10.5120/ijca2017915638},
	publisher = {Foundation of Computer Science (FCS), NY, USA},
	address = {New York, USA}
}

Abstract

Eating disorders are an important cause of physical and psychosocial morbidity in adolescent girls and young adult women [1]. Eating disorders (EDs) are classified into three main types, anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder. Other rare disorders include, Purging disorder (purging without binge eating) and Night eating syndrome (excessive night time food consumption), Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder, Rumination Disorder etc [2]. Eating disorders and certain associated with genetic predisposition and traits. There is a clear and possibly substantial genetic contribution to both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Factors that contribute EDs include several risk factors including biological, psychological, social and interpersonal factors.

Network analysis—the study of molecular interactions equates with the mathematical field of graph theory, in which the assembly of pair wise connections (edges) between discrete objects (nodes) coalesces to form a network, or graph [3].

References

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Keywords

Eating Disorders, Bulimia Nervosa, Anorexia Nervosa, Molecular Interactions.